Should we be celebrating the PRC’s 60th Birthday?

The 1st October is the 60th anniversary of the birth of the Peoples Republic of China. There will be much pomp and circumstance involved and we’ll have lots of propoganda pushed forward about how wonderful the PRC is and all it’s achievements.

And let’s be honest there have been many achievement s and Australia relies heavily on the PRC continuing to improve so that we can continue to make loads of money from selling it resources.

But what is interesting is how the CCP although they have junked huge swathes of their revolutionary fervor still need to keep the PRC’s citizens under the jackboot. no real criticism is allowed:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8278014.stm

The regimes attitude to any form of dissent is often brutal as we can see from recent events in Tibet and Xinjiang, and of course the massive show of force against Taiwan. it is estimated over 600 IRBM’s are aimed at a country that bears no military threat to the Chung Kuo but has the temerity to say it doesn’t really want to be formally part of it.

The PRC see itself as a victim and the CCP is pushing the nationalist barrow as fast as it can (oblivious it seems to what happens when you merge ‘nationalist’ and ‘socialist’ together). It’s ability to utilise cyberwarfare against it’s competitors or detractors is pretty frightening as is it’s often quantum  PR mistakes like the recent furore over an Uigher civil rights activist and the Melbourne Film festivals invitation for her to attend. 

If it is not bad enough that the PRC restricts the rights of its citizens it actively supports other regimes that do the same Burma, North Korea, Zimbabwe, Sudan, etc etc and will not allow the UN to actively defend the rights of those affected by their governments sociopathic desires.

60 years ago China was extremely poor, and since then it has improved the lot of its average citizen by leaps and bounds. However at the same time those with contacts in the CCP have become very, very rich and rule of law is almost non-existant as long as the CCP controls the courts. Yes  there are occassionally corruption show trials but the rot is deep.

Then there is the ecological damage. Again there are two faces. China is a leading player in renewable energy. however the damage that has been done and the arable land lost to either pollution or re-development is staggering. So much so that the PRC must now import food. the there is the heavy metal water and air pollutants. Not to mention the stuff we don’t know about in the PLA’s secret arms testing areas in the remote vastness of china’s western provinces.

There will be those who will argue that considering how the western democracies have behaved over the years, means we cannot comment about how the PRC is run and what it does. There will be apologists who will always believe the worst about their own country and forgive the transgressions of others because of their alleged political leanings. What these people miss is that in the 21st century for any country to deny its people the right to freedom of speech and association is clearly WRONG. Oh and before any smart alec wants to say about lack of freedom of expression here. Writing a petition Australia does not get you hard labour or restrictions on who you talk to or where you can go.

So Happy Birthday PRC, but it’s time for the CCP to loosen it’s talons in the back of the chinese people, especially those not of Han ethnicity.

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2 Responses to “Should we be celebrating the PRC’s 60th Birthday?”

  1. Moko Says:

    To be honest – which is usually a bad idea – China sits along side Iran, or Syria, or Lebabnon, or some other crazy fucken looney bin with a bad attitude and guns. FKN bomb the FKRS and get it over with.

    We all know it’s gonna go bad. 10 nukes down the center of Iran should do it. Turn the joint to a huge friggen Middle Eastern glass center piece and teach the wankers a lesson globally.

  2. Moko Says:

    …we’d only have to give Israel the nod and they’ll do it then head for the pub.

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